DizzyAGE turns 10

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Adz.M
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DizzyAGE turns 10

Post by Adz.M » Sun Mar 06, 2016 2:37 pm

According to the History page on the DizzyAGE site, the now popular Dizzy Adventure Game Engine launched 10 years ago today!

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March 6, 2006 - Grand Opening
Finally after more than a half of year, DizzyAGE v1.0 is released along with the official web site and two small games. Everyone is invited to download them!
The two games in question were Dizzy and the Mushroom Pie and Dizzy and the Healing Potion.

So 10 years on, over 110 amazing fan games have been released using the DizzyAGE engine and 10 Annual Easter Competitions have taken place here in the Community.

We like to say a big thank you to Alexandru and Christina Simion for bringing us this fabulous game maker and we will all look forward to seeing what the future holds for DizzyAGE.

Why not share your memories with us here. :)
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Post by AndyG » Mon Mar 07, 2016 2:32 pm

Ever since I discovered DizzyAGE, it's been my absolute favourite thing. If it had been around when I was in middle school, I really think I might be dead from not sleeping or eating. Thanks a lot Simions!! You're amazing :D

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Post by xelanoimis » Tue Mar 08, 2016 3:35 pm

Happy celebration to everyone who helped this community over the last 10 years!

A really big "Thank You" to the guys behind the Yolkfolk website and the forums for keeping it all together!

I'm very happy with the result of the DizzyAGE engine and for helping so many developers to realize their dream-games and to share them with the Dizzy fans. I must confess that when I started it I didn't expect so many games made with it and this is now really rewarding for me.

So, the biggest "Thank You" goes to the people who made all these games and who share their creations every year!
I hope this will go on and on for many more years!

I will "officially" announce the competition these days, on the website, so get your games ready for the Easter Competition event!

Alex

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Post by Noggin the Nog » Tue Mar 08, 2016 5:55 pm

I discovered DizzyAGE back in the winter of 2012 whilst looking for an emulated version of MagicLand Dizzy. Played a few of the fan games and found myself thinking about ideas for games of my own.

It's not the easiest program to learn - if it hadn't been for Jamie's videos I'd have given up at the start - but I made a little test game with 6 puzzles and an end sequence, then began to plan a game proper.

The thing I like about DizzyAGE is that it's really open ended. With Snow Queen, the game expanded to twice the size as I kept thinking of new puzzles - things I couldn't have thought of to start with because I didn't understand the game code yet. It was the same with Don't Panic, I got to keep trying new things as I went along.


Incidentally, my favourite fan game is Illusion Island. Once you find the reality goggles, it gets really interesting and addictive. I was playing for ages too - I made the mistake of selling the big diamond (was it called 'something valuable'?) and had to win all my coins back on the arcade machine. :v2_dizzy_eek:

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Post by AndyG » Wed Mar 09, 2016 12:42 pm

Oh yes! Jamie is definitely due a big thank you. I actually first downloaded DizzyAGE when I was at uni, probably around 2007, but I couldn't work out what to do with it and assumed my computer was missing something. (I was also enjoying a small cocaine habit so I didn't have much patience anyway..). When I realised there were YouTube tutorial videos, I really got into it.

My fave games are Sunken Castle (so atmospheric! And claustrophobic), Grogg Island (for all of how massive the map is and how much backtracking is needed..) and Mystic Forest.

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Post by Grandad » Thu Mar 10, 2016 8:46 am

I would second a big thanks to Jamie, not just his games (my fave's are Illusion Island and the Dextor 'trilogy' ( :v2_dizzy_lol: :) )
Not forgetting how helpful he was with our coding queries when he had more time to hang around this website.

Andy - not blowing my own trumpet or anything but I designed the 'tea bag' used in Grogg Island when I was helping to test it.

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Post by AndyG » Fri Mar 11, 2016 1:39 pm

No way! I suppose the moral there is that I should get others involved more at the play testing stage. Though I should have learned this already after my previous two buggy games..

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Post by Grandad » Sat Mar 12, 2016 10:00 am

I wouldn't worry about it Andy, I usually wait for Sn Trooper (and Frog and Hat) to discover the bugs in my new games as it's really difficult, even with testers, to get everything spot on - there's always somebody who'll try something you never even thought of.

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Post by Meph » Wed Mar 16, 2016 6:21 pm

Only ten years? feels like it's been around forever.
I'm just shocked i even managed to learn the basics and was able to cobble a few games together, as i'ma real dumb dumb truth be told. I was quite pleased i was able to learn something new.

Sadly i won't have anything again this year, i've not had the time.. i use to make Dizzy games over the winter when i had very little work on, but last few years i've not really stopped. I do hope i find the time to do at at least one more , i want to make a crystal maze version, and i always wanted to set one in a theme park, plus i recall a Dozy game i was going to do lol Oh well, might be unemployed next winter so lol

Fav dizzyage games... well Illusion island, mystic forest and rail road all come to mind, and those 'Dizzy legends' were fantastic, and being able to recreate Boulder Dash, and Booty was great. Dizzy on the other side was also an epic adventure.

I also remember how excited we all were when someone first did character switching.. (Yolkfolk to the Rescue ?)
and Dizzy Remakes were the games that got me into Dizzyage.
Its always the cracked ones that let the light in

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Post by delta » Mon Mar 21, 2016 8:54 pm

Blimey, 10 years...!

I remember, back in late 2006 or early 2007, idly thinking 'I wonder if anyone else remembers Dizzy?' So I googled it and came across something called DizzyAGE. The thought that I could actually maybe make my own Dizzy game was quite exciting, and I spent about two weeks playing around with it, trying to grasp how it worked. It was a steep, steep learning curve - DizzyAGE was still on version 1.31, and was quite a lot different to work on (and rather less intuitive) than version 2.0 onwards. I forget the differences, but they were substantial (no movement coding, for example). I actually still have v1.2 of Diamond Mine Dizzy, which uses DizzyAGE v1.31, on my computer.

Anyway, I'm not ashamed to admit that in the first two weeks of trying to code it, I almost gave up completely. Almost everything I did or changed in the coding seemed to throw up an error that made the game crash. And I didn't have a clue what I'd done wrong, or where the error was coming from. So much so that I used to keep a copy of the game so that I could revert back to if I couldn't fix the problem. That was a test game that I did, with a few rooms and a few puzzles. Unfortunately I don't have it anymore - I suspect I deleted it years ago.

As far as I can recall, my first game, Diamond Mine Dizzy, was just a load of puzzles copied from each other, so that not much could go wrong! I actually didn't join the forums here (indeed, didn't really know about them) until about Feb 2007. I can't remember how I found them, but it was probably through the DizzyAGE site, or Alex might have told me about them. It was about halfway through coding DMD though.

OH GOD! I've just been looking through some of my really early posts on here, and I've come across a post saying that all I needed to do was "list all the static brushes i've assigned IDs to in the 'Save' file..." which reminded me that in v1.31 you needed to keep track of all the brush IDs, as it didn't automatically save them! :v2_dizzy_scared: See what I mean about the changes to v2 being substantial? That was a right pain in the arse...

Anyway, suffice it to say that, at the start, I really had no clue what I was doing at that point, and that clearly shows in DMD, which is a pretty simple game.

I'm quite humbled by the number of people who have mentioned my games in their comments. I'm slightly surprised by the number mentioning Illusion Island - it's not one that I have fond memories of coding (indeed, I barely remember it at all), but obviously the 'twist' was something that people liked. My personal favourite is Mystic Forest Dizzy :)

As for the others, well once I'd figured out how to code the games, I most enjoyed pushing the technical boundaries. Whether that was with the arcade games in IID, the top-down view of the Dizzy Legends series (unlikely to ever be completed, sorry!), or many of the later games I did. Sometimes I'd write a game almost purely to see if I could. For example, Bubble Trouble Dizzy draws its own levels as it goes along, with no two games ever the same (what a right royal PITA that was!). I think Quiggie almost had a heart attack when she realised that it can never actually be completed... (it just keeps on drawing more levels!)

As another example, Rock Dash Dizzy dumped pretty much all the movement coding, and I wrote my own bespoke movement code especially for that game. In fact, the way almost everything was coded in that game was unique, and I'm sure anyone looking at the coding would wonder what on earth it all does (I probably would too, now!). I do remember though, that nothing moves in that game, other than Dizzy. That would be far far too complicated. What happens instead, is that there are hundreds of square objects in a grid, which each changing their properties (and image) depending on what it needs to be. So a diamond can be made to look like it's falling through air, whereas in fact all that's happening is that a blank square sees that the square above it is a diamond, and changes itself to be a diamond (and the square above to be blank), making it look like the diamond is falling.

Pirate Ship Dizzy is one that I'm particularly proud of, mainly because I automated absolutely everything in the game, so there is no item-specific coding at all, it's all in the AI (and the map). Because of this, and stripping out the parts of the default coding that I didn't use, the game size is actually smaller than the default template...

Anyway, I'm getting caught in a reverie here. Of course, none of this would have been possible without help at the start, particularly from Alex, who talked me through how to do a lot of stuff in the early days. Also, Peter was a big help, having coded the first fan-games made with DizzyAGE. When I started coding, Peter was 'the boss' - the person who knew what was what!

Alex deserves a huge amount of credit for DizzyAGE. What a lot of people don't realise is just how flexible an engine DizzyAGE is. I think I've probably proved that by doing stuff with it that it was never designed specifically to do, but which it was able to, because of how flexible it is.

I've got a lot busier over the past four years or so, life has moved on, and I don't have time to play any of the fan games anymore. But I do still check in here every month or so, and see what's going on. I'll even offer advice if I think I have something relevant to say ;) But playing around with DizzyAGE was a great way to spend four years of my spare time, and a lot of fun too. It's good to see that others are keeping it going strong. :v2_dizzy_thumbsup:
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